Humane Games

Humane Games are: games for education, games for health, and games for change. They can work either through the play or through the making. This tumblr celebrates Humane Games, and reflective and critical play.

Apr 19
syfycity:

Is there a potential for Virtual Reality (like Oculus Rift) to harm people’s interactions with actual reality?

once again, from the beginning.

syfycity:

Is there a potential for Virtual Reality (like Oculus Rift) to harm people’s interactions with actual reality?

once again, from the beginning.


Apr 18
“I’ve been a long time fan of the Montessori approach to education, but it was only recently that I read The Montessori Method. Contrary to popular teacher methods that focus on shaping the path of a student’s learning (consider that most school systems force students down the same learning path), Maria Montessori focused on creating a learning environment that encourages exploration and discovery. To this day, Montessori classrooms around the world encourage independent learning and nurture natural curiosity, which leads to lifelong learners.”

poetpainter

This is a UX/UI exploration of virtual platforms and environments that have engendered loyalty and passion. I keep thinking of Koster’s Theory of Fun as I scan this text. I will have to read them closely against each other to see if my intuition has sense to it.


Apr 17

dinosaurparty:

(via This iPhone Game Tricks You Into Dancing)
I saw this game demo’d at GDC, and it just looks so lovely. I can’t wait to play.


Apr 16
punkarcade:

Ok, here is the game Marshall 4 that you can play online (click the green flag to start). It’s created entirely in Scratch, the kid-friendly programming language designed at MIT. In Scratch, code is made up of lego-like blocks that you snap together. I’ve made a few things in Scratch, and let me tell you, this game Marshall 4 must have been a bear to build, not because Scratch is hard (it isn’t), but because it’s really for making much simpler games, animations and objects. Not only is a fun to play platform game,  the animation of the ball is sophisticated, there are no bugs (at least that i could find), and the game is enough of a challenge that I wanted to keep playing. That’s rather impressive for a Scratch game, it has high ratings. After playing, take a look at the code to get a good human-readable understanding of how the game was made. Remember that in Scratch, each sprite (like the Marshall ball, or a key, or a button) has its own code that tells it what to do, so try looking at the code for each sprite, and you can even try to remix it and create your own fork of the game (as 217 others have done so far).-LT

punkarcade:

Ok, here is the game Marshall 4 that you can play online (click the green flag to start). It’s created entirely in Scratch, the kid-friendly programming language designed at MIT. In Scratch, code is made up of lego-like blocks that you snap together. I’ve made a few things in Scratch, and let me tell you, this game Marshall 4 must have been a bear to build, not because Scratch is hard (it isn’t), but because it’s really for making much simpler games, animations and objects. Not only is a fun to play platform game,  the animation of the ball is sophisticated, there are no bugs (at least that i could find), and the game is enough of a challenge that I wanted to keep playing. That’s rather impressive for a Scratch game, it has high ratings. After playing, take a look at the code to get a good human-readable understanding of how the game was made. Remember that in Scratch, each sprite (like the Marshall ball, or a key, or a button) has its own code that tells it what to do, so try looking at the code for each sprite, and you can even try to remix it and create your own fork of the game (as 217 others have done so far).-LT



theruleofthegames:

At PAX East, one of the best panels I saw was "The Mythology In and Of Games: Why the Legend of Zelda is just as important as the Legend of Beowulf". I actually got to chat with Chris Yap (who was speechless at the critical positive reaction to the panel) and he just informed me that he’d posted the panel on YouTube.

So if you missed the panel at PAX or have an hour to spare on a quite amazing panel (although I must admit, the best parts are probably towards the end) I encourage you to watch and share!


Call for Games: Edugaming 2014

Educational Games:
Do you have a video game or board game that effectively teaches a concept?

submission deadline April 30, 2014

We are looking for the submission of games that are playable. They will be featured at the Edugaming Conference where the attendees will get the opportunity to play the games. Your game does not need to be complete, but must be playable. All types of games are welcome.

We are looking for games created by:

Teachers
University and College Students
Governmental Entities
Academics
Professional Game Designers


Please Email (computergaming@lccc.edu) the:

The title of the game
The name, address, phone numbers, and email address of each person who will present
A summary of the game and the educational concept it covers
A synopsis of no more than 100 words that will be suitable for inclusion in the program and on the website
Either a short video or photos of the game for inclusion in our program and website


punkarcade:

Just a goodbye obituary to freeindiegam.es. For about 2 years, a team of 4 game curators selected new DIY free videogames and posted them to the blog regularly. What they lacked in descriptions, they made up for in breadth and quality. Freeindiegame.es was often my go-to site when I wanted to find something brand new, on the bleeding edge, and darn-it, a punk videogame. Several days ago they posted a goodbye announcement. It’s a huge loss that I’m feeling already, and I’m going to try to step up and post games more regularly here on Punk Arcade as a small way to carry on its legacy.

punkarcade:

Just a goodbye obituary to freeindiegam.es. For about 2 years, a team of 4 game curators selected new DIY free videogames and posted them to the blog regularly. What they lacked in descriptions, they made up for in breadth and quality. Freeindiegame.es was often my go-to site when I wanted to find something brand new, on the bleeding edge, and darn-it, a punk videogame. Several days ago they posted a goodbye announcement. It’s a huge loss that I’m feeling already, and I’m going to try to step up and post games more regularly here on Punk Arcade as a small way to carry on its legacy.


Apr 15
“The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in.”

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story

Complement with more secrets of storytelling from Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut and Neil Gaiman, then see the neurochemistry of storytelling and the dramatic art.

(via explore-blog)

Well-organized absence of information

(via vellum)


Apr 13
(via Witness Video Game History: Attend Atari Landfill Excavation on April 26)

Become a part of gamer history. Unearth the truth behind the ultimate urban legend. We’re excited to announce that the excavation of the long-rumored “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game burial site will occur on April 26, 2014 and will be open to the public. Spectators are invited to watch the team uncover the infamous Atari game cartridge grave. 

The Atari Corporation – faced with overwhelmingly negative response to the “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game – allegedly disposed of millions of unsold game cartridges by burying them in the small town of Alamogordo, New Mexico in 1983. Fuel Entertainment took an interest in the legend, and in December 2013, with help from local garbage contractor Joe Lewandowski, acquired the exclusive rights to excavate the Alamogordo landfill. Fuel Entertainment brought the opportunity to Xbox Entertainment Studios, and now, as part of a documentary series (developed by Xbox Entertainment Studios and two-time Academy Award® winning producer Simon Chinn and Emmy winning producer Jonathan Chinn, through their multi-platform media company, Lightbox), the team will excavate the legendary New Mexico landfill to reveal the true story of Atari’s bizarre burial. 

Director Zak Penn (“X-Men 2,” “Avengers,” and “Incident at Loch Ness”) will be documenting the dig and the events around it. In addition to fans and media, a variety of people tied to the dig, video game, and film will be in attendance – including “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game designer Howard Scott Warshaw, a team of archeologists and representatives from Xbox Entertainment Studios, Lightbox and Fuel Entertainment. We hope you’ll join us as we get to the bottom of one of gaming’s biggest mysteries. A lucky handful of fans could even be interviewed for the film. Full details about the dig can be found below. See you in Alamogordo!

Alamogordo Landfill Excavation Details:

Saturday, April 26, 2014
9:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Alamogordo Landfill
4276 Highway 54 S
Alamogordo, NM 88310
(Near First Street and White Sands Boulevard)

City of Alamogordo Website:  http://ci.alamogordo.nm.us/

(via Witness Video Game History: Attend Atari Landfill Excavation on April 26)

Become a part of gamer history. Unearth the truth behind the ultimate urban legend. We’re excited to announce that the excavation of the long-rumored “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game burial site will occur on April 26, 2014 and will be open to the public. Spectators are invited to watch the team uncover the infamous Atari game cartridge grave.

The Atari Corporation – faced with overwhelmingly negative response to the “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game – allegedly disposed of millions of unsold game cartridges by burying them in the small town of Alamogordo, New Mexico in 1983. Fuel Entertainment took an interest in the legend, and in December 2013, with help from local garbage contractor Joe Lewandowski, acquired the exclusive rights to excavate the Alamogordo landfill. Fuel Entertainment brought the opportunity to Xbox Entertainment Studios, and now, as part of a documentary series (developed by Xbox Entertainment Studios and two-time Academy Award® winning producer Simon Chinn and Emmy winning producer Jonathan Chinn, through their multi-platform media company, Lightbox), the team will excavate the legendary New Mexico landfill to reveal the true story of Atari’s bizarre burial.

Director Zak Penn (“X-Men 2,” “Avengers,” and “Incident at Loch Ness”) will be documenting the dig and the events around it. In addition to fans and media, a variety of people tied to the dig, video game, and film will be in attendance – including “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game designer Howard Scott Warshaw, a team of archeologists and representatives from Xbox Entertainment Studios, Lightbox and Fuel Entertainment. We hope you’ll join us as we get to the bottom of one of gaming’s biggest mysteries. A lucky handful of fans could even be interviewed for the film. Full details about the dig can be found below. See you in Alamogordo!

Alamogordo Landfill Excavation Details:

Saturday, April 26, 2014
9:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Alamogordo Landfill
4276 Highway 54 S
Alamogordo, NM 88310
(Near First Street and White Sands Boulevard)

City of Alamogordo Website: http://ci.alamogordo.nm.us/


Apr 11

rhizomedotorg:

Performances from Solo show in Sim City by Kim Asendorf

(via effimerafoundation)



comicsworkbook:

“Unless, you’re one of those rare mutant virtuosos of raw force, you’ll find that competitive tennis, like money pool, requires geometric thinking, the ability to calculate not merely your own angles but the angles of response to your angles.”

-David Foster Wallace from Derivative Sport in Tornado Alley 1990 (substitute tennis for comics and it still makes sense)

Apr 8
“Unable to fit on the school bus, [André the Giant] was driven to school by playwright Samuel Beckett, a neighbor.”

André the Giant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What.

(via merlin)


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