Humane Games

Humane Games are: games for education, games for health, and games for change. They can work either through the play or through the making. This tumblr celebrates Humane Games, and reflective and critical play.

Jul 29

(via What I Learned Turning The Israel-Palestine Conflict Into A Video Game) by Asi Burak for Kotaku. You should read it.

(via What I Learned Turning The Israel-Palestine Conflict Into A Video Game) by Asi Burak for Kotaku. You should read it.


Jul 28

Call for Games as Art Works

via Rhizome.org:

OPPORTUNITY | CALL FOR ARTWORKS:
Open Call: Art & Technology Festival

CultureHub is seeking works of art that deal with the themes of play, game mechanics, interaction, participation, and presence for our annual festival that takes place November 21-23, 2014. Submissions that implement emerging media and examine technological frameworks in an innovative way are encouraged. Artists working in all mediums and disciplines including visual art, sound, and performance are welcome to submit.

When applying, please include:
-images and/or links to video or documentation
-a description of no more than 400 words
-a brief artist bio or CV
and any other relevant information for consideration of your piece within a single document or pdf file.

The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2014. Selected works may be featured in the exhibition accompanying the festival or as screenings or performances within our studio.
International artists are welcome to submit projects, but we ar e unable to provide support for travel. Submissions should be directed to submissions@culturehub.org with “Festival Submission 2014” in the subject line.

We look forward to reviewing your submissions!
Link: http://culturehub.org/

Deadline: Mon Sep 1st, 2014

Submitted by: Culturehub SeoulArts/La MaMa | Mon Jul 28th, 2014 1:33 p.m.


…board games have some of the best player experiences around,” says McDonough.

"They really have a world of their own in providing excellent fun and play, but also really clear and well-executed and elegant design. When I was learning to be a game designer, board games were one of my best inspirations and they still are. I’ve got quite the board game collection and I’m expanding all the time.

The grand strategies of Firaxis • Eurogamer.net

Jul 25

IndieCade profiled by MOCA LA



Jul 24
new-aesthetic:

Son Finds His Late Dad’s ‘Ghost’ In A Racing Video Game
This is lovely, strange, and wrenching all at the same time. A teenager whose father passed away when he was just six had pulled out an old Xbox game that he and his dad used to play together, only to discover a part of his father lived on in the game, as a ghost car. This is less supernatural than that sentence sounds. In racing video games, a ghost car is a representation of a previous player’s inputs and actions as they drove the track previously. Usually, the fastest laps are stored as ghost cars and then used by players to help them find the best line around a track, or have a way to compete with another player in a time-shifted way.
Via Jake H.

new-aesthetic:

Son Finds His Late Dad’s ‘Ghost’ In A Racing Video Game

This is lovely, strange, and wrenching all at the same time. A teenager whose father passed away when he was just six had pulled out an old Xbox game that he and his dad used to play together, only to discover a part of his father lived on in the game, as a ghost car.

This is less supernatural than that sentence sounds. In racing video games, a ghost car is a representation of a previous player’s inputs and actions as they drove the track previously. Usually, the fastest laps are stored as ghost cars and then used by players to help them find the best line around a track, or have a way to compete with another player in a time-shifted way.

Via Jake H.


Jul 23
slavin:

"… when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together - until he died, when i was just 6. 

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years. but once i did, i noticed something. we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came. and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST. literaly. 

you know, when a time race happens, that the fastest lap so far gets recorded as a ghost driver? yep, you guessed it - his ghost still rolls around the track today. and so i played and played, and played, untill i was almost able to beat the ghost. until one day i got ahead of it, i surpassed it, and… i stopped right in front of the finish line, just to ensure i wouldnt delete it.

Bliss.” 

(via Teenage son discovers his deceased father’s ghost car in Xbox rally game | Motoramic - Yahoo Autos)

slavin:

"… when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together - until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years. but once i did, i noticed something. we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came. and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST. literaly.

you know, when a time race happens, that the fastest lap so far gets recorded as a ghost driver? yep, you guessed it - his ghost still rolls around the track today. and so i played and played, and played, untill i was almost able to beat the ghost. until one day i got ahead of it, i surpassed it, and… i stopped right in front of the finish line, just to ensure i wouldnt delete it.

Bliss.”

(via Teenage son discovers his deceased father’s ghost car in Xbox rally game | Motoramic - Yahoo Autos)


Like much of the collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Dwarf Fortress is a baffling, inscrutable mess. But with proper interpretation, even the most intimidating forms can provide for moments of admiration. Polygon sat down with one of the creators of Dwarf Fortress, Tarn Adams, to talk about his work. We wanted to take just a piece of the whole — world creation — and unpack it. To make it digestible.
And in the process we found a whole new respect for the game.”
Dwarf Fortress will crush your CPU because creating history is hard | Polygon

Jul 22
Thousands of game-makers participated in Gamasutra’s annual salary survey earlier this year and the results—broken down by creative discipline and focusing on the state of he industry in the U.S.—have just been made available. Is a career in game making a worthwhile pursuit, financially speaking? Depends on what you do and who you do it with. (via How Much Game Makers Get Paid)

Thousands of game-makers participated in Gamasutra’s annual salary survey earlier this year and the results—broken down by creative discipline and focusing on the state of he industry in the U.S.—have just been made available. Is a career in game making a worthwhile pursuit, financially speaking? Depends on what you do and who you do it with. (via How Much Game Makers Get Paid)


Jul 21

First Person Scholar organizes a Psuedo Game Jam!

Hi all,

Please forward the following to anyone you think might be interested:

First Person Scholar is Hosting a Game Jam!

Well, not quite?it?s a pseudo game jam. It?s not located anywhere and you don?t have to program anything. We?re looking for written descriptions of the processes and procedures that make up a game. We call them procedural poems. Here?s what you need to know: there’s a grand prize valued at $170, submissions are due July 31st, 2014, entries are 300 words max. Visit http://www.firstpersonscholar.com/pseudo-game-jam/ for more details, including an example procedural poem, and the submission form.

More Info About the Pseudo Game Jam

The idea behind the pseudo game jam is to allow virtually anyone to easily prototype an idea about a game. We aim to accomplish this by shifting the focus away from technical constraints onto the expression of an idea or argument through the description of processes. We think of this as a kind of ludo-poiesis?the art of making through gameplay. Our hope is that at the end of the jam we will have dozens of procedural poems that readers can ‘play’ in their minds. The procedural poems themselves describe the set-up and play-through of a game (max. 300 words). And they need to fit the broad theme of ‘Rethinking Conventions.’

About First Person Scholar

First Person Scholar aims to occupy the niche between academic blogs and journals in establishing an informed, sustained conversation. Our articles are relatively short, thought-provoking pieces that are intended to stimulate debate on games and games scholarship. In that respect, our contributors are encouraged to take calculated risks with their submissions; we want to hear scholars think out loud about gaming in a way that challenges accepted definitions and practices. If journals document where games studies has gone, we are about where games studies is going. We are currently accepting submissions. For more details visit: http://www.firstpersonscholar.com/about/


Michael Hancock


Jul 18
One challenge that we’ve encountered is that there isn’t a lot of precedent for this kind of game, and a lot of existing knowledge about how to construct first person shooter (FPS) maps is useless when you have only two players and melee weapons. Game balance isn’t easy either because in Chambara, it’s a matter of deliberate shadow placement, rather than adjusting values on a spreadsheet. Yet, all the polish and balance in the world won’t make Chambara great if it’s morally broken. (via Meet The Indie Developer Using ‘Samurai Jack’ To Inspire A New Style Of Gaming | The Creators Project) Team OK interviewed by Vice for The Creator’s Project. My son, Esteban is part of the five person team.

One challenge that we’ve encountered is that there isn’t a lot of precedent for this kind of game, and a lot of existing knowledge about how to construct first person shooter (FPS) maps is useless when you have only two players and melee weapons. Game balance isn’t easy either because in Chambara, it’s a matter of deliberate shadow placement, rather than adjusting values on a spreadsheet. Yet, all the polish and balance in the world won’t make Chambara great if it’s morally broken. (via Meet The Indie Developer Using ‘Samurai Jack’ To Inspire A New Style Of Gaming | The Creators Project) Team OK interviewed by Vice for The Creator’s Project. My son, Esteban is part of the five person team.


Jul 17

Jul 14

The video game industry was quick to industrialise. Where literature, music and cinema had chance to explore their artistic potential away from monetary preoccupations, video games were born into the arcade where, Cinderella-like they had to earn their keep on the bar floor, minute by minute, credit by credit. Atari, one of the earliest video game companies, would playtest its games in select American bars for a fortnight. If the game failed to earn enough money, it would be figuratively thrown out onto the street. In this way video games and money were yoked from an early age. Thereafter, the cultural conversation has always been secondary to the industrial question: how do we monetise this?

But this is only one kind of success story. Video games, like photography, music, cinema and literature, have tremendous value aside from any consideration of financial gain. If the incentive that we present to young people for making games is predominantly a financial one, then we are all the poorer. Video games allow people to express themselves and present the ways in which they experience and interact with the world and its systems in a unique way to others. Games are, predominantly, a way for self-expression and enrichment and yet the conversation is primarily focused on the “how” of making a living than the “what” of what might be possible within the medium’s bounds.

Simon Parkin is probably the best writer on videogames working today, maybe ever. Here he is over at New Statesman, talking all things this. (via kierongillen)

internetarchive:

September 13th, 1985 - Japanese electronics company Nintendo releases the game Super Mario Bros. in Japan for the Famicom computer system. The game was a sequel to 1983’s Mario Bros. Over the course of its life the game would sell over 40,240,000 copies worldwide, making it the 2nd bestselling video game of all time.

Later in October, Nintendo brings out the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) to the United States. The NES console and Super Mario Bros. becomes one of the first major gaming systems and video games to reach the mainstream American market, making a lasting impact on gaming and popular culture. Now Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, and all the rest have become household names, TV and movie characters, Guiness World Record holders, and have gone on to spawn the single biggest video game franchise globally.

Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 0:21:18 without warps - Andrew Gardikis


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