Humane Games

Humane Games are: games for education, games for health, and games for change. They can work either through the play or through the making. This tumblr celebrates Humane Games, and reflective and critical play.

Apr 16

Call for Games: Edugaming 2014

Educational Games:
Do you have a video game or board game that effectively teaches a concept?

submission deadline April 30, 2014

We are looking for the submission of games that are playable. They will be featured at the Edugaming Conference where the attendees will get the opportunity to play the games. Your game does not need to be complete, but must be playable. All types of games are welcome.

We are looking for games created by:

Teachers
University and College Students
Governmental Entities
Academics
Professional Game Designers


Please Email (computergaming@lccc.edu) the:

The title of the game
The name, address, phone numbers, and email address of each person who will present
A summary of the game and the educational concept it covers
A synopsis of no more than 100 words that will be suitable for inclusion in the program and on the website
Either a short video or photos of the game for inclusion in our program and website


punkarcade:

Just a goodbye obituary to freeindiegam.es. For about 2 years, a team of 4 game curators selected new DIY free videogames and posted them to the blog regularly. What they lacked in descriptions, they made up for in breadth and quality. Freeindiegame.es was often my go-to site when I wanted to find something brand new, on the bleeding edge, and darn-it, a punk videogame. Several days ago they posted a goodbye announcement. It’s a huge loss that I’m feeling already, and I’m going to try to step up and post games more regularly here on Punk Arcade as a small way to carry on its legacy.

punkarcade:

Just a goodbye obituary to freeindiegam.es. For about 2 years, a team of 4 game curators selected new DIY free videogames and posted them to the blog regularly. What they lacked in descriptions, they made up for in breadth and quality. Freeindiegame.es was often my go-to site when I wanted to find something brand new, on the bleeding edge, and darn-it, a punk videogame. Several days ago they posted a goodbye announcement. It’s a huge loss that I’m feeling already, and I’m going to try to step up and post games more regularly here on Punk Arcade as a small way to carry on its legacy.


Apr 15
“The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in.”

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story

Complement with more secrets of storytelling from Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut and Neil Gaiman, then see the neurochemistry of storytelling and the dramatic art.

(via explore-blog)

Well-organized absence of information

(via vellum)


Apr 13
(via Witness Video Game History: Attend Atari Landfill Excavation on April 26)

Become a part of gamer history. Unearth the truth behind the ultimate urban legend. We’re excited to announce that the excavation of the long-rumored “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game burial site will occur on April 26, 2014 and will be open to the public. Spectators are invited to watch the team uncover the infamous Atari game cartridge grave. 

The Atari Corporation – faced with overwhelmingly negative response to the “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game – allegedly disposed of millions of unsold game cartridges by burying them in the small town of Alamogordo, New Mexico in 1983. Fuel Entertainment took an interest in the legend, and in December 2013, with help from local garbage contractor Joe Lewandowski, acquired the exclusive rights to excavate the Alamogordo landfill. Fuel Entertainment brought the opportunity to Xbox Entertainment Studios, and now, as part of a documentary series (developed by Xbox Entertainment Studios and two-time Academy Award® winning producer Simon Chinn and Emmy winning producer Jonathan Chinn, through their multi-platform media company, Lightbox), the team will excavate the legendary New Mexico landfill to reveal the true story of Atari’s bizarre burial. 

Director Zak Penn (“X-Men 2,” “Avengers,” and “Incident at Loch Ness”) will be documenting the dig and the events around it. In addition to fans and media, a variety of people tied to the dig, video game, and film will be in attendance – including “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game designer Howard Scott Warshaw, a team of archeologists and representatives from Xbox Entertainment Studios, Lightbox and Fuel Entertainment. We hope you’ll join us as we get to the bottom of one of gaming’s biggest mysteries. A lucky handful of fans could even be interviewed for the film. Full details about the dig can be found below. See you in Alamogordo!

Alamogordo Landfill Excavation Details:

Saturday, April 26, 2014
9:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Alamogordo Landfill
4276 Highway 54 S
Alamogordo, NM 88310
(Near First Street and White Sands Boulevard)

City of Alamogordo Website:  http://ci.alamogordo.nm.us/

(via Witness Video Game History: Attend Atari Landfill Excavation on April 26)

Become a part of gamer history. Unearth the truth behind the ultimate urban legend. We’re excited to announce that the excavation of the long-rumored “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game burial site will occur on April 26, 2014 and will be open to the public. Spectators are invited to watch the team uncover the infamous Atari game cartridge grave.

The Atari Corporation – faced with overwhelmingly negative response to the “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game – allegedly disposed of millions of unsold game cartridges by burying them in the small town of Alamogordo, New Mexico in 1983. Fuel Entertainment took an interest in the legend, and in December 2013, with help from local garbage contractor Joe Lewandowski, acquired the exclusive rights to excavate the Alamogordo landfill. Fuel Entertainment brought the opportunity to Xbox Entertainment Studios, and now, as part of a documentary series (developed by Xbox Entertainment Studios and two-time Academy Award® winning producer Simon Chinn and Emmy winning producer Jonathan Chinn, through their multi-platform media company, Lightbox), the team will excavate the legendary New Mexico landfill to reveal the true story of Atari’s bizarre burial.

Director Zak Penn (“X-Men 2,” “Avengers,” and “Incident at Loch Ness”) will be documenting the dig and the events around it. In addition to fans and media, a variety of people tied to the dig, video game, and film will be in attendance – including “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game designer Howard Scott Warshaw, a team of archeologists and representatives from Xbox Entertainment Studios, Lightbox and Fuel Entertainment. We hope you’ll join us as we get to the bottom of one of gaming’s biggest mysteries. A lucky handful of fans could even be interviewed for the film. Full details about the dig can be found below. See you in Alamogordo!

Alamogordo Landfill Excavation Details:

Saturday, April 26, 2014
9:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Alamogordo Landfill
4276 Highway 54 S
Alamogordo, NM 88310
(Near First Street and White Sands Boulevard)

City of Alamogordo Website: http://ci.alamogordo.nm.us/


Apr 11

rhizomedotorg:

Performances from Solo show in Sim City by Kim Asendorf

(via effimerafoundation)



comicsworkbook:

“Unless, you’re one of those rare mutant virtuosos of raw force, you’ll find that competitive tennis, like money pool, requires geometric thinking, the ability to calculate not merely your own angles but the angles of response to your angles.”

-David Foster Wallace from Derivative Sport in Tornado Alley 1990 (substitute tennis for comics and it still makes sense)

Apr 8
“Unable to fit on the school bus, [André the Giant] was driven to school by playwright Samuel Beckett, a neighbor.”

André the Giant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What.

(via merlin)


dinosaurparty:

(via ​A Game That Helped Me Cope With A Family Member’s Dementia)
This gave me chills. I’d definitely play Ether One.


prostheticknowledge:

Apple Patents for Automatic 3D Avatar Creation and Emotional States

Something to expect in the future in regards to online identity (both of which were filed today):

A three-dimensional (“3D”) avatar can be automatically created that resembles the physical appearance of an individual captured in one or more input images or video frames. The avatar can be further customized by the individual in an editing environment and used in various applications, including but not limited to gaming, social networking and video conferencing.

I wonder if this will be connected to Apple’s purchase of depth sensor company Primesense [Link to patent file]

Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for creating and using customized avatar instances to reflect current user states are disclosed. In various implementations, the user states can be defines using trigger events based on user-entered textual data, emoticons, or states of the device being used. For each user state, a customized avatar instance having a facial expression, body language, accessories, clothing items, and/or a presentation scheme reflective of the user state can be generated.

[Link to patent file]




Apr 7
Rethinking video games Our design process has been greatly informed by the games team being part of the larger ustwo family of studios. Our colleagues are (for the most part) smart people and discerning fans of art, culture and design. Why do so few of them play games, even on mobile? Surrounded by these experts in UX, I realised that designing a game is essentially the same as designing a user experience. Thinking of what we create as ‘experiences’ more than ‘games’, it became clear that there are some popular elements of traditional video games that often frustrate less hardcore players and leave them excluded. (via ustwo | Monument Valley out now)

Rethinking video games Our design process has been greatly informed by the games team being part of the larger ustwo family of studios. Our colleagues are (for the most part) smart people and discerning fans of art, culture and design. Why do so few of them play games, even on mobile? Surrounded by these experts in UX, I realised that designing a game is essentially the same as designing a user experience. Thinking of what we create as ‘experiences’ more than ‘games’, it became clear that there are some popular elements of traditional video games that often frustrate less hardcore players and leave them excluded. (via ustwo | Monument Valley out now)


fastcodesign:

This Xbox Controller Can Sense Your Boredom, Make A Game More Violent
Heart rate, temperature, respiration, and perspiration: These are our autonomous functions—our core physiological processes—that signal stress or arousal and can betray our otherwise cool exteriors. Stanford researcherGregory Kovacs is reading these signals through a modified Xbox game controller. By adding a new, sensor-laden back plate, he can measure heart rate, blood flow, rate and depth of breath, and how hard and fast the user shakes the controller.
In response to these measurements, Kovacs has designed a game that can maximize excitement by adding more stimulus (like bad guys or explosions) whenever a gamer’s heart rate drops. Or it could do the reverse, ramping down the zombie factor for someone who wants to take it easy (but insists on playing zombie games to do so).

heavy sigh…

fastcodesign:

This Xbox Controller Can Sense Your Boredom, Make A Game More Violent

Heart rate, temperature, respiration, and perspiration: These are our autonomous functions—our core physiological processes—that signal stress or arousal and can betray our otherwise cool exteriors. Stanford researcherGregory Kovacs is reading these signals through a modified Xbox game controller. By adding a new, sensor-laden back plate, he can measure heart rate, blood flow, rate and depth of breath, and how hard and fast the user shakes the controller.

In response to these measurements, Kovacs has designed a game that can maximize excitement by adding more stimulus (like bad guys or explosions) whenever a gamer’s heart rate drops. Or it could do the reverse, ramping down the zombie factor for someone who wants to take it easy (but insists on playing zombie games to do so).

heavy sigh…

(via kenyatta)


Apr 5

skeptv:

Phil: Chinlone (Thought Café Today)

Phil takes you on a journey to Myanmar (Burma) to show you the non-competitive sport known as Chinlone - a great passion of his - and what could be considered a very unique sport in our competitive climate.

via Thought Café.

(via elmerseason)