Humane Games

Humane Games are: games for education, games for health, and games for change. They can work either through the play or through the making. This tumblr celebrates Humane Games, and reflective and critical play.

Jul 5
“He was being kind. Velasco Carballo’s role in the ugliness cannot be minimized. A Spaniard, he is known as a high-level official but it seemed clear that he was determined to avoid using cards to control the players. That decision backfired, particularly as it related to Fernandinho; instead of giving the players a comfort level to play more freely early on, his leniency served as an elastic band on the game, encouraging the players, especially the Brazilians, to try to see just how much contact they could get away with on Rodriguez without being punished.” For Bellicose Brazil, Payback Carries Heavy Price: Loss of Neymar - NYTimes.com

Jul 4

“MISSION STATEMENT
Our mission is to create a platform for higher education leaders which will underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic importance of video game programs in colleges and universities. The key is to create a robust network of resources—including unified advocacy, policymaker engagement, media coverage, and external funding—in order to incubate and harness the impact of this community in a 21st century learning environment.”
Higher Education Video Games Association




Jul 3
christianmccrea:

http://www.martin.nerurkar.de/games/sushi-hands/sushi.htmlTotally into how this looks, an awkward quick-hands party game called Sushi Hands, coming out of the Lyst game jam on sex and love. 

christianmccrea:

http://www.martin.nerurkar.de/games/sushi-hands/sushi.html

Totally into how this looks, an awkward quick-hands party game called Sushi Hands, coming out of the Lyst game jam on sex and love. 


ilovecharts:

Messi is a Beast

via Chris Keefe


A game manual is given meaning by the game world it is about, not by a dictionary. A physics textbook is a “game manual” for the actions, experiences, and problem solving that physicists engage in. The textbook, too, is given meaning by the “game” and the world it is played in (a somewhat different world than our everyday world, since physicists, thanks to their tools, can see things like electrons).

In school, we give people texts when they have not had enough experience in the worlds the texts are about, the experiences that give the texts meaning. It is as if we were to give kids game manuals without the games. It only works for kids who are getting a lot of experiences at home—backed up by lots of talk with adults about these experiences, talk which helps the kids learn to map language on to experience and vice-versa—but it is disastrous for less advantaged kids.

Paul Games Gee (via hongkongteacher)

Lionel Messi is impossible

jkottke:

An open-and-shut case from FiveThirtyEight: Lionel Messi is far and away the best player in football. Ronaldo is the only player who is close and he’s not even all that close.

By now I’ve studied nearly every aspect of Messi’s game, down to a touch-by-touch level: his shooting and scoring production; where he shoots from; how often he sets up his own shots; what kind of kicks he uses to make those shots; his ability to take on defenders; how accurate his passes are; the kind of passes he makes; how often he creates scoring chances; how often those chances lead to goals; even how his defensive playmaking compares to other high-volume shooters.

And that’s just the stuff that made it into this article. I arrived at a conclusion that I wasn’t really expecting or prepared for: Lionel Messi is impossible.

It’s not possible to shoot more efficiently from outside the penalty area than many players shoot inside it. It’s not possible to lead the world in weak-kick goals and long-range goals. It’s not possible to score on unassisted plays as well as the best players in the world score on assisted ones. It’s not possible to lead the world’s forwards both in taking on defenders and in dishing the ball to others. And it’s certainly not possible to do most of these things by insanely wide margins.

But Messi does all of this and more.

The piece is chock-full of evidential graphs of how much of an outlier Messi is among his talented peers:

Messi Thru Ball Graph

One of my favorite things that I’ve written about sports is how Lionel Messi rarely dives, which allows him to keep the advantage he has over the defense.


Jul 2
hijabiswag:

friendship game strong

hijabiswag:

friendship game strong

(via mistyknights)


The specific purpose of this post–perhaps I should have begun with the thesis–is to say something about both games and schools. In addition, I’d like to express a general message about the way we transmit values to the next generation. Are we doing it with intention? Do we take the time to think about the stories our educational structures relay to our children? What behaviors do we celebrate? What procedural actions do we reward? Do we behave the way we say we want our children to behave? The data seems to say: NO.
I challenge game designers to rethink the mechanics, not just the stories. Even most of the social impact games that I see simply transplant narrative rhetoric atop familiar styles of gameplay. The same goes for schools; understand that the organizational structure is indistinct from the students’ learning outcomes.
And let’s get rid of this silly distinction between learning games and commercial games, between entertainment and education. Kids (and adults) are ALWAYS learning something. Remember that, intentional or not, you’re accountable for the lessons you teach the next generation. ( Via: Jordan Shapiro in FORBES, “The Hidden Moral Messages In Video Games”)

The specific purpose of this post–perhaps I should have begun with the thesis–is to say something about both games and schools. In addition, I’d like to express a general message about the way we transmit values to the next generation. Are we doing it with intention? Do we take the time to think about the stories our educational structures relay to our children? What behaviors do we celebrate? What procedural actions do we reward? Do we behave the way we say we want our children to behave? The data seems to say: NO.

I challenge game designers to rethink the mechanics, not just the stories. Even most of the social impact games that I see simply transplant narrative rhetoric atop familiar styles of gameplay. The same goes for schools; understand that the organizational structure is indistinct from the students’ learning outcomes.

And let’s get rid of this silly distinction between learning games and commercial games, between entertainment and education. Kids (and adults) are ALWAYS learning something. Remember that, intentional or not, you’re accountable for the lessons you teach the next generation. ( Via: Jordan Shapiro in FORBES, “The Hidden Moral Messages In Video Games”)


As Cheshire noted in his original documentation for the game, “Bolo is the Hindi word for communication. Bolo is about computers communicating on the network, and more important about humans communicating with each other (via Bolo (1987 video game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

As Cheshire noted in his original documentation for the game, “Bolo is the Hindi word for communication. Bolo is about computers communicating on the network, and more important about humans communicating with each other (via Bolo (1987 video game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Jul 1
“But the World Cup has ended that run, while simultaneously providing plentiful resources for solving the underlying problem. Thus, yesterday, as Brazil squeaked to victory, I read The Laws Of The Game. It turns out that not only does football consider itself above having anything as commonplace as ‘rules’, it also considers itself above having to specify which game its laws apply to: there is only one game, and that game is football, would seem to be the first unspoken law of The Laws Of The Game. I’d recommend giving it a read – it’s shorter, lighter, more thought-provoking that you might expect. I don’t yet know how it compares to the rulebooks for other professional sports, but I’m willing to bet that some rule books (American Football especially?) are rule-ier and bookier. The ‘Powers And Duties’ section, which starts on page 71, is a particularly entertaining introduction to what it can take to GM a game of soccer.” The first rule of laws | LOOKSPRING

Jun 30

Hybrid Play, How it works video. Not sure what to make of this. Will have to investigate further.