Humane Games

Humane Games are: games for education, games for health, and games for change. They can work either through the play or through the making. This tumblr celebrates Humane Games, and reflective and critical play.

Apr 8

prostheticknowledge:

Apple Patents for Automatic 3D Avatar Creation and Emotional States

Something to expect in the future in regards to online identity (both of which were filed today):

A three-dimensional (“3D”) avatar can be automatically created that resembles the physical appearance of an individual captured in one or more input images or video frames. The avatar can be further customized by the individual in an editing environment and used in various applications, including but not limited to gaming, social networking and video conferencing.

I wonder if this will be connected to Apple’s purchase of depth sensor company Primesense [Link to patent file]

Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for creating and using customized avatar instances to reflect current user states are disclosed. In various implementations, the user states can be defines using trigger events based on user-entered textual data, emoticons, or states of the device being used. For each user state, a customized avatar instance having a facial expression, body language, accessories, clothing items, and/or a presentation scheme reflective of the user state can be generated.

[Link to patent file]




Apr 7
Rethinking video games Our design process has been greatly informed by the games team being part of the larger ustwo family of studios. Our colleagues are (for the most part) smart people and discerning fans of art, culture and design. Why do so few of them play games, even on mobile? Surrounded by these experts in UX, I realised that designing a game is essentially the same as designing a user experience. Thinking of what we create as ‘experiences’ more than ‘games’, it became clear that there are some popular elements of traditional video games that often frustrate less hardcore players and leave them excluded. (via ustwo | Monument Valley out now)

Rethinking video games Our design process has been greatly informed by the games team being part of the larger ustwo family of studios. Our colleagues are (for the most part) smart people and discerning fans of art, culture and design. Why do so few of them play games, even on mobile? Surrounded by these experts in UX, I realised that designing a game is essentially the same as designing a user experience. Thinking of what we create as ‘experiences’ more than ‘games’, it became clear that there are some popular elements of traditional video games that often frustrate less hardcore players and leave them excluded. (via ustwo | Monument Valley out now)


fastcodesign:

This Xbox Controller Can Sense Your Boredom, Make A Game More Violent
Heart rate, temperature, respiration, and perspiration: These are our autonomous functions—our core physiological processes—that signal stress or arousal and can betray our otherwise cool exteriors. Stanford researcherGregory Kovacs is reading these signals through a modified Xbox game controller. By adding a new, sensor-laden back plate, he can measure heart rate, blood flow, rate and depth of breath, and how hard and fast the user shakes the controller.
In response to these measurements, Kovacs has designed a game that can maximize excitement by adding more stimulus (like bad guys or explosions) whenever a gamer’s heart rate drops. Or it could do the reverse, ramping down the zombie factor for someone who wants to take it easy (but insists on playing zombie games to do so).

heavy sigh…

fastcodesign:

This Xbox Controller Can Sense Your Boredom, Make A Game More Violent

Heart rate, temperature, respiration, and perspiration: These are our autonomous functions—our core physiological processes—that signal stress or arousal and can betray our otherwise cool exteriors. Stanford researcherGregory Kovacs is reading these signals through a modified Xbox game controller. By adding a new, sensor-laden back plate, he can measure heart rate, blood flow, rate and depth of breath, and how hard and fast the user shakes the controller.

In response to these measurements, Kovacs has designed a game that can maximize excitement by adding more stimulus (like bad guys or explosions) whenever a gamer’s heart rate drops. Or it could do the reverse, ramping down the zombie factor for someone who wants to take it easy (but insists on playing zombie games to do so).

heavy sigh…

(via kenyatta)


Apr 5

skeptv:

Phil: Chinlone (Thought Café Today)

Phil takes you on a journey to Myanmar (Burma) to show you the non-competitive sport known as Chinlone - a great passion of his - and what could be considered a very unique sport in our competitive climate.

via Thought Café.

(via elmerseason)


Apr 3

nadiaoxford:

internally-inconsistent:

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

One of my ongoing issues with the games industry..

When developing Assassin’s Creed III, Ubisoft was about to stick the Mohawk tribe in teepees. Thankfully a lightbulb went on over someone’s head and they said, “We should research this shit.” Live sources were consulted, books were opened - or Wikipedia was fired up - and it was discovered the Mohawks lived primarily in longhouses. Hooray! Learning!

I’d like to see game devs take this sort of thing much more seriously, and I’d definitely like to see a lot less rolling of eyes and moaning about “political correctness” when a studio is criticized for this kind of laziness. 

Seriously, we’re desperate to convince ourselves that video games are all growed up, but if an author wrote a book situated in Pakistan and made Arabic the primary language, they’d rightfully be flushed down the toilet.  

(via kenyatta)



Apr 1
“Operating from one-room grottoes or in favelas called “co-working spaces,” indies recreated the products they had once fashioned for their corporate overseers.” What Are Game Developers? A View From the Future - Ian Bogost - The Atlantic

Mar 31

“To me, a lot of game development is the community that surrounds it. It’s the people who get together to share ideas, meld those ideas into new ideas, and help build each other up.” Let’s talk about accountability | amen sister Adriel.

“Indie development is small. It is a very closely knit, communicative place bound together by common causes and artistic vision. Everyone knows everyone, and they all understand that the process of creating games isn’t a flashy affair; it is a deeply invested journey that requires energy, passion and thoughtfulness on par with any other artistic medium.” How The Most Expensive Game Jam In History Crashed And Burned In A…

Mar 29
“But, ultimately, I argue that the concept of “violent video games” has about as much conceptual utility as “blond people” does in informing us about the characteristics of individual women and men. Our insistence on treating the concept of “violent video games” as something meaningful has succeeded mainly in keeping debates on video games emotional rather than rational. Furthermore, I argue that such terms have maintained researchers’ focus on an emotionally loaded Holy Grail in trying to link such media to an array of public health outcomes. Too often, this has functioned as a block to a sophisticated program of research examining the specific and idiosyncratic ways in which specific game design elements interact with specific users’ wants and needs in ways that are probably both more interesting and valuable. We can only hope that a new, nuanced, more balanced approach such as that recently suggested by Isabella Granic and her colleagues in the APA’s flagship journal will hold sway in future research.” Violent Video Games Don’t Exist | Christopher J. Ferguson

(via absurdhowl)


“The many skills children develop through play, particularly the self-control practiced and refined in imaginary play, are related to long-term academic achievement.”

Wendy Banning and Ginny Sullivan quoted in an article by David Sobel at Yes! MagazineYou Can’t Bounce Off the Walls If There Are No Walls: Outdoor Schools Make Kids Happier—and Smarter

Lens on Outdoor Learning

(via protoslacker)